Posts filed under ‘R’

Richard and Robin

Richard and Robin were two pretty men;

They laid abed till the clock struck ten;

Robin starts up and looks at the sky,

Oh ho! Brother Richard, the sun’s very high,

Do you go before with the bottle and bag,

And I’ll follow after on little Jack Nag.

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June 18, 2018 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Riding

Riding, riding let us go
Where the cherry blossom grow
Pretty parasol and fan
In far off Japan

May 31, 2018 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Raise Your Hand

Roses are red.
Lettuce is green.
If you raise your hand,
it will be seen.

From How To Talk So Kids Can Learn
By Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish

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April 17, 2018 at 3:25 pm Leave a comment

World Poetry Day 2018: ‘Relativity’

Sarah Howe: “Relativity”

for Stephen Hawking

When we wake up brushed by panic in the dark
our pupils grope for the shape of things we know.

Photons loosed from slits like greyhounds at the track
reveal light’s doubleness in their cast shadows

that stripe a dimmed lab’s wall — particles no more — 
and with a wave bid all certainties goodbye.

For what’s sure in a universe that dopplers
away like a siren’s midnight cry? They say

a flash seen from on and off a hurtling train
will explain why time dilates like a perfect

afternoon; predicts black holes where parallel lines
will meet, whose stark horizon even starlight,

bent in its tracks, can’t resist. If we can think
this far, might not our eyes adjust to the dark?

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March 21, 2018 at 3:25 pm Leave a comment

Revolting Rhymes

Revolting Rhymes
By Roald Dahl
Illustrated by Quentin Blake

I bet you think you know this story.You don’t. The real one’s much more gory. From Cinderella and Goldilocks to Little Red Riding Hood and the Three Little Pigs, wicked beasts, brazen crooks and a ghastly giant star in these hilarious nursery rhymes with BITE!

From Book To Animation: What It Took To Adapt Roald Dahl’s ‘Revolting Rhymes’

Revolting Rhymes was recently short-listed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in the animated shorts category for the 90th Academy Awards. Originally broadcast as two episodes on the BBC, the production is an adaptation of the book by Roald Dahl that was illustrated by Quentin Blake. It was helmed by directors Jakob Schuh and Jan Lachauer, and made by Magic Light Pictures, the company behind The Gruffalo.

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January 7, 2018 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Rainmakers From the Gods


The Origins of the Katsinam
The Ceremonies

November 19, 2017 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Říkadla


JANÁČEK Říkadla

Ríkadla ‘Nursery Rhymes’

Ríkadla (‘Nursery Rhymes’) is a series of eighteen choral songs with instrumental introduction. Janácek had originally composed eight of the set in 1925, and extended the number to eighteen a year later, adding the introduction at the same time. The instrumentation, which includes that faintly ridiculous but eminently likeable poor relation of the orchestra’s reed instruments, the ocarina, was deliberately intended to complement the risible atmosphere of these engaging ditties.
But it’s all tremendous fun! From the nuptials of the beetroot and the measured hedgerow stealth of the mole, to wind-blown and ripped trousers, and the tragi-comic picture of the cow in the knacker’s yard serenaded by Franta’s grinding string-bass, the world is that of a child distilled through peculiarly Czech folklore and sentiment.

Yet this is not a world spared pain nor the frightening grotesqueries of the imagination—children parade a pet dog whose tail cannot have become entrapped without their assistance, and a dutiful wife ends up in her own soup! And exactly why is Granny crawling amid the concealing foliage of an elder bush? Could there be a mild hint of xenophobia as a ‘German’ beetle fails to own up after breaking some cooking utensils?—‘the cunning German tells such lies!’

The Ríkadla settings owe their origins to the early neglect of Janácek’s first opera Šárka, which remained unperformed until the mid 1920s. Deeply hurt by the rejection of a work based upon one of the most familiar and terrifying subjects of Czech mythology (the libretto was by Julius Zeyer), the composer decided in 1888 to undertake a systematic study of Moravian folk music. The fruits of his discoveries emerged in his choral idiom and, to an extent, are also reflected in the textual content of the Ríkadla series, though as we have seen these were not written until many years after Janácek’s initial exploration of traditional Moravian music. His experiences, in the course of amassing folk music, were broadly parallelled by episodes in the careers of Bartók, Kodály and, on British soil, of Vaughan Williams.

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September 18, 2017 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

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