Posts filed under ‘OLD MOTHER HUBBARD’

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD

The Real Mother Goose

Old Mother Hubbard;
Went to the cupboard,
To give her poor dog a bone;
But when she got there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.

She went to the baker’s
To buy him some bread;
When she came back
The dog was dead.

She went to the undertaker’s
To buy him a coffin;
When she got back
The dog was laughing.

She took a clean dish
To get him some tripe;
When she came back
He was smoking a pipe.

She went to the alehouse
To get him some beer;
When she came back
The dog sat in a chair.

She went to the tavern
For white wine and red;
When she came back
The dog stood on his head.

She went to the hatter’s
To buy him a hat;
When she came back
He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber’s
To buy him a wig;
When she came back
He was dancing a jig.

She went to the fruiterer’s
To buy him some fruit;
When she came back
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor’s
To buy him a coat;
When she came back
He was riding a goat.

She went to the cobbler’s
To buy him some shoes;
When she came back
He was reading the news.

She went to the sempster’s
To buy him some linen;
When she came back
The dog was a-spinning.

She went to the hosier’s
To buy him some hose;
When she came back
He was dressed in his clothes.

The dame made a curtsy,
The dog made a bow;
The dame said, “Your servant,”
The dog said, “Bow-wow.”

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May 26, 2008 at 3:01 pm Leave a comment

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD

THE ROLE OF CATS IN NURSERY RHYMES
by Sarah Hartwell

Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard
To get her wee Pussy some fish,
Whemnshe got there
The cupboard was bare
With nothing for Pussycat’s [poor Pussy’s] dish.

It’s quite common for cat lovers to adapt existing nursery rhymes into cat-themed rhymes that children in a cat-owning household can better relate to. Any hidden meaning that the rhyme might once have had will often get lost in the process, but we are left with a charming rhyme nonetheless. Despite being written down in books, nursery rhymes are not static entities. They have evolved over the decades and will continue to evolve. Of relatively recent origin, we have a feline version of Old Mother Hubbard and her empty cupboard that concerns not a dog and a bone, but a cat and some fish.

May 26, 2008 at 2:52 pm Leave a comment


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