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How the Stars Came to Be

How the Stars Came to Be

By Poonam Mistry

Have you ever wondered how the stars came to be in the sky?

The Fisherman’s Daughter loved to dance in the sunlight, and bathe in the glow of the moon. But when the moon disappeared for a few nights each month, she worried about her father and how he would find his way home from the sea in the deep darkness. When the sun finds her sobbing one
night, he takes one of his rays and shatters it onto the ground, creating the stars and giving the girl the task of putting them into the dark night sky. This beautifully illustrated story gives us a new folk tale, and a new way to look up at the night sky.

Discover How the Stars Came to Be by winning a stunning book

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December 8, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Falling

October 6, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

En Voyage

by Jacques Charpentreau

Quand vous m’ennuyez, je m’éclipse,
Et, loin de votre apocalypse,
Je navigue, pour visiter
La Mer de la Tranquillité.

Vous tempêtez ? Je n’entends rien.
Sans bruit, au fond du ciel je glisse.
Les étoiles sont mes complices.
Je mange un croissant. Je suis bien.

Vous pouvez toujours vous fâcher,
Je suis si loin de vos rancunes !
Inutile de me chercher :
Je suis˘ encore dans la lune.

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July 30, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Such a small planet

by Benjamin Gibeaux

Atchoo 🙂

July 27, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Rabbit on the Moon

World tales of the Moon

Long ago, the gods tried four times to get the Sun in the sky but each time the Sun disappeared. All the world was cold and in darkness. The Aztec gods came together and tried to think of a way to get the Sun to stay in the sky.

One of the gods said, “We must build a big fire and one of us must throw ourselves into the fire. Well, they all thought it was good idea — for someone else.

Finally a god named Tecuiziztecatl said, “Yo lo hare, I will do it, yo so poderoso, I am powerful.

Then Nanahautzin was chosen. He said, “Yo no soy poderosa. I am not powerful. It is true that I have been sick and my body is covered with sores but I am a good man.”

So the gods built a huge fire and danced and drummed around the fire for four days and nights. On the fourth night, all the gods arranged themselves into two lines. Tecuiziztecatl was chosen first. He ran toward the fire but when he got to it, he stopped. Then he looked around and said, “Tengo miedo. I am afraid.” This happened three more times.

Then it was Nanahuatzin’s turn. He stood at the beginning of the lines, determined. He ran down between the gods and when he got to the edge, he jumped into the fire with a shout of joy. He went into the sky and became the Sun. Tecuiziztecatl was so ashamed that he too leaped into the fire and another huge flaming Sun was in the sky.

The gods looked up and said, “Ah, this is good. Now we have two Suns.” One of the gods said, “Wait, Tecuitziztecatl has no right to shine as bright as brave Nanahautizin!”

The god picked up a round-eared rabbit and threw it at Tecuitziztecatl. It went flying, spinning across the sky and landed hard against him and knocked some of the light from him. Tecuiziztecatl became the Moon, la luna. Nanahautzin became the Sun, la sol.

When there is a full Moon, an outline of the rabbit the god threw that night can still be seen.

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July 18, 2019 at 8:25 pm 2 comments

En juin…

En juin, soleil qui donne n’a jamais ruiné personne.

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June 5, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Rona and the Moon


By Peter Gossage

Rona is charged with the important task of making food ready for her family when they return from a fishing trip. As night falls, she uses the moon to light her way. But when the moon slides behind a cloud she becomes angry and a curse sprays from her mouth. The moon does not take her curse lightly …

Māori legend Man in the Moon:
According to Māori legend, a Ngaio tree can be seen on the moon:

The man in the moon becomes, in Māori legend, a woman, one Rona by name. This lady, it seems, once had occasion to go by night for water to a stream. In her hand she carried an empty calabash. Stumbling in the dark over stones and the roots of trees she hurt her shoeless feet and began to abuse the moon, then hidden behind clouds, hurling at it some such epithet as “You old tattooed face, there!” But the moon-goddess heard, and reaching down caught up the insulting Rona, calabash and all, into the sky. In vain the frightened woman clutched, as she rose, the tops of a ngaio-tree. The roots gave way, and Rona with her calabash and her tree are placed in the front of the moon for ever, an awful warning to all who are tempted to mock at divinities in their haste.

Rona and the Moon/Ko Rona me te Marama . pdf

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January 18, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

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