Posts filed under ‘.pudding’

Flower of England, Fruit of Spain

Flower of England, Fruit of Spain,
Met together in a shower of rain.
Put in a bag, Tied around with a string
If you tell me this riddle, I’ll give you a ring.

(more…)

December 23, 2013 at 3:25 pm Leave a comment

Over the River

by Lydia Maria Child

Over the river, and through the wood,
To Grandfather’s house we go;
The horse knows the way to carry the sleigh
through the white and drifted snow.

Over the river, and through the wood—
Oh, how the wind does blow!
It stings the toes and bites the nose
As over the ground we go.

Over the river, and through the wood,
To have a first-rate play.
Hear the bells ring, “Ting-a-ling-ding”,
Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day!

Over the river, and through the wood
Trot fast, my dapple-gray!
Spring over the ground like a hunting-hound,
For this is Thanksgiving Day.

Over the river, and through the wood—
And straight through the barnyard gate,
We seem to go extremely slow,
It is so hard to wait!

Over the river, and through the wood—
Now Grandmother’s cap I spy!
Hurrah for the fun! Is the pudding done?
Hurrah for the pumpkin pie!

November 25, 2010 at 2:02 am Leave a comment

Plum Pudding for Christmas

From the sweet book by Virgina Kahl

“All right,” said the King, “I guess I can come,
If you serve a pudding – and that pudding is plum.
Plums that are purple, plums in a clump,
So that each bumpy limp is a plum that is plump.”

“Oh, fine,” said the Dutchess. “He says he can come
If we serve a pudding – and that pudding is plum.
A plum pudding’s easy – it’s nothing to bake it,
So let’s start at once, and we’ll all help you make it.

January 19, 2010 at 5:20 pm Leave a comment

THE CAT AND THE PUDDING STRING

THE ROLE OF CATS IN NURSERY RHYMES
by Sarah Hartwell

Sing, sing, what shall I sing?
The cat’s run away with the pudding string,
Do, do, what shall I do?
The cat’s run away with the pudding too.

Sing, sing, what shall I sing?
Cat’s run away with the pudding-string!
Do, do, what shall I do?
The cat has bitten it quite in two.

Sing sing, what shall I sing?
The cat has eat[en] the pudding-string!
Do, do, what shall I do?
The cat has bit[ten] it quite in two.

In this day of convenience foods and microwave or canned puddings, it is easy to forget how steamed or boiled puddings used to be made. In many cases, a ball of raw pudding mix went into a muslin square and the muslin was gathered up and tied shut. The result was a spherical pudding. The alternative was to steam the pudding in a pudding basin with a foil lid tied on with string. In either case, the trailing string would have been irresistible to a playful cat. A cat that dragged the pudding string away might well have found the pudding still attached, much to cook’s dismay! An alternative version has the cat biting the pudding string in half. The third variation is even more nonsensical as it has the cat biting the string in two after eating it.

May 25, 2008 at 3:24 pm Leave a comment


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