Posts filed under ‘.picture’

Amazing Water: An Introduction to Classical Music

amazing-waterAmazing Water: An Introduction to Classical Music
by The Secret Mountain

The works of Vivaldi, Beethoven, Debussy, and others are introduced to children by demonstrating how water—from the sea, rivers, fountains, rainfall and so forth—has inspired the composers.

(more…)

December 1, 2016 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

JANOSCH’S WORLD OF PICTURES

March 11, 2011 at 9:03 pm Leave a comment

Le sentier au bord de l’eau à Sahurs, le soir

September 8, 2010 at 6:10 pm Leave a comment

Mary Had a Little Lamb


Mary Had a Little Lamb” is a nursery rhyme of 19th-century American origin.

Original text

Mary had a little lamb ,
Its fleece was white as snow;
And everywhere that Mary went,
The lamb was sure to go. He followed her to school one day;
Which was against the rule;
It made the children laugh and play;
To see a lamb at school. “Why does the lamb love Mary so?”
The eager children cry;
“Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know,”
The teacher did reply.

Song

In the 1830s, Lowell Mason set the nursery rhyme to a melody written by Mozart, adding repetition in the verses:

Mary had a little lamb,
little lamb, little lamb,
Mary had a little lamb, whose fleece was white as snow.
And everywhere that Mary went,
Mary went, Mary went,
and everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go. It followed her to school one day
school one day, school one day,
It followed her to school one day, which was against the rules.
It made the children laugh and play,
laugh and play, laugh and play,
it made the children laugh and play to see a lamb at school. And so the teacher turned it out,
turned it out, turned it out,
And so the teacher turned it out, but still it lingered near,
And waited patiently about,
patiently about, patiently about,
And waited patiently about till Mary did appear. “Why does the lamb love Mary so?”
Love Mary so? Love Mary so?
“Why does the lamb love Mary so,” the eager children cry.
“Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know.”
The lamb, you know, the lamb, you know,
“Why, Mary loves the lamb, you know,” the teacher did reply.

Music:

eSnips
Wikipedia Media

June 14, 2008 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep

Baa Baa Black Sheep is a nursery rhyme, now sung to a variant of the 1761 French melody Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman. The original form of the tune is used for Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and the Alphabet song.

Music:

.wav

Standard version

Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full.
One for the master,
One for the dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

Variants

In Mother Goose’s Melody (circa 1765) the last lines run:

But none for the little boy
Who cries in the lane.[1]

An old variant of the ending runs:

Two for the master,
one for the dame,
but none for the little boy
who lives down the lane.

June 13, 2008 at 3:39 pm Leave a comment

The Lion and the Unicorn

The Lion and the Unicorn are time-honoured symbols of the United Kingdom. They are properly speaking heraldic supporters, appearing in the full Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom. The lion stands for England and the unicorn for Scotland. The combination therefore dates back to the 1603 accession of James I of England who was already James VI of Scotland.

Their notorious rivalry in heraldic legend has translated into a famous nursery rhyme:

The lion and the unicorn were fighting for the crown
The lion beat the unicorn all around the town.
Some gave them white bread, and some gave them brown;
Some gave them plum cake and drummed them out of town.

The Lion and the Unicorn

June 13, 2008 at 2:43 pm Leave a comment

THE ANTS AND THE GRASSHOPPER

Aesop’s Fable

One bright day in late autumn a family of Ants were bustling about in the warm sunshine, drying out the grain they had stored up during the summer, when a starving Grasshopper, his fiddle under his arm, came up and humbly begged for a bite to eat.

“What!” cried the Ants in surprise, “haven’t you stored anything away for the winter? What in the world were you doing all last summer?”

“I didn’t have time to store up any food,” whined the Grasshopper; “I was so busy making music that before I knew it the summer was gone.”

The Ants shrugged their shoulders in disgust.

“Making music, were you?” they cried. “Very well; now dance!” And they turned their backs on the Grasshopper and went on with their work.

There’s a time for work and a time for play.

June 12, 2008 at 2:27 pm Leave a comment

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