Posts filed under ‘.online’

Moqui & The Kachina Doll

Moqui & The Kachina Doll
by Linda L. Rigsbee

Moqui is a 10-year-old Hopi Indian girl living in a pueblo in northwest Arizona during the 1700’s, but in some ways the problems she faces are not much different from the problems girls face today.
Moqui wants to fit in with the other girls her age. She wants to do fun things, but her mother thinks she is too young. She is upset about all the boring chores she has been given and wants to be trusted with the care of the Kachina Dolls.
When a Zuni refugee family from another pueblo joins them, Moqui becomes friends with Hanovi, who is four years older. Hanovi is cheerful about her chores and finds ways to make them challenging and fun. Hanovi befriends Moqui and soon she is being included in more interesting chores.
At first it is fun, but soon Moqui realizes the fun includes responsibilities. Life becomes more complicated. She is so caught up with her own struggles that she doesn’t realize how difficult life has been for Hanovi and her family.
At the peak of Moqui’s achievement, the truth is unveiled and Moqui must decide if she wants to make a huge sacrifice to help Hanovi.

This story unfolds with history and authentic Hopi customs. It is a fast read for a suggested audience of ages 8 to 12.

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November 20, 2017 at 3:25 pm Leave a comment

Digital Archive of Soviet Children’s Books

A Digital Archive of Soviet Children’s Books Goes Online: Browse the Artistic, Ideological Collection (1917-1953)

July 21, 2017 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

The Met: Open Access

Image and Data Resources
field-with-cypresses

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February 17, 2017 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

GAME: Ice Age Europe

Ice Age Europe game
iceagegame

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January 7, 2017 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

150 years of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland!

CATHY CASSIDY ALICE IN WONDERLAND

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May 15, 2015 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Stonehenge Game

Stonehenge: Stand or Fall?
stonehenge-education-game

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September 2, 2014 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

We Still Live Here

WampanoagCelebrated every Thanksgiving as the ‘Indians’ who saved the Pilgrims from starvation and then largely forgotten, the Wampanoag communities of southeastern Massachusetts are reviving their native tongue, a language that had been silenced for more than 100 years.
WATCH We Still Live Here – Âs Nutayuneân

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November 16, 2013 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

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