Posts filed under ‘.legend’

Lumaaq

Co Hoedeman | 1975 | 7 min

Lumaaq tells the story of a legend widely believed by the Povungnituk Inuit. The artist’s drawings are transferred to paper, cut out, and animated under the camera. The result is Inuit prints in action. Dialogue, music and artwork make this film a total cultural transplant.

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October 12, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

A Mid-Autumn Festival Legend

6 Most Well-Known Legends about Mid-Autumn Festival

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September 13, 2019 at 10:25 am 1 comment

Lady White Snake

Lady White Snake

Retold by Aaron Shepard

Illustrated by Song Nan Zhang

Pan Asian Publications

Lady White is a thousand-year-old snake who, through centuries of meditation and self-discipline, has managed to attain human form. On a visit to China’s famous West Lake, she falls in love with a young man and soon becomes his wife. But when a Buddhist abbot discovers her true origin, she must fight for both her marriage and her freedom.

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August 18, 2019 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Rabbit on the Moon

World tales of the Moon

Long ago, the gods tried four times to get the Sun in the sky but each time the Sun disappeared. All the world was cold and in darkness. The Aztec gods came together and tried to think of a way to get the Sun to stay in the sky.

One of the gods said, “We must build a big fire and one of us must throw ourselves into the fire. Well, they all thought it was good idea — for someone else.

Finally a god named Tecuiziztecatl said, “Yo lo hare, I will do it, yo so poderoso, I am powerful.

Then Nanahautzin was chosen. He said, “Yo no soy poderosa. I am not powerful. It is true that I have been sick and my body is covered with sores but I am a good man.”

So the gods built a huge fire and danced and drummed around the fire for four days and nights. On the fourth night, all the gods arranged themselves into two lines. Tecuiziztecatl was chosen first. He ran toward the fire but when he got to it, he stopped. Then he looked around and said, “Tengo miedo. I am afraid.” This happened three more times.

Then it was Nanahuatzin’s turn. He stood at the beginning of the lines, determined. He ran down between the gods and when he got to the edge, he jumped into the fire with a shout of joy. He went into the sky and became the Sun. Tecuiziztecatl was so ashamed that he too leaped into the fire and another huge flaming Sun was in the sky.

The gods looked up and said, “Ah, this is good. Now we have two Suns.” One of the gods said, “Wait, Tecuitziztecatl has no right to shine as bright as brave Nanahautizin!”

The god picked up a round-eared rabbit and threw it at Tecuitziztecatl. It went flying, spinning across the sky and landed hard against him and knocked some of the light from him. Tecuiziztecatl became the Moon, la luna. Nanahautzin became the Sun, la sol.

When there is a full Moon, an outline of the rabbit the god threw that night can still be seen.

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July 18, 2019 at 8:25 pm 2 comments

A Gift of Corn to the Choctaw

Across the eastern United States and Canada there are over 10,000 sacred mounds. Choctaw traditions link their mounds with their ancestors, corn, and the sky. One story tells of two hunters who feed a poor woman. She turns out to have magical powers and rewards the hunters and their people with corn.

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November 27, 2018 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

Haudenosaunee’s Legendary Founding

The Hiawatha wampum belt tells the story of the Haudenosaunee’s legendary founding and wampum’s power to heal. It tells of a warrior named Hiawatha who meets a prophet known as the Peacemaker. Together, with the help of Jigonsaseh, the first Clan Mother, they bring an end to war and create America’s first democracy.

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November 26, 2018 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

NATIVE AMERICAN LEGENDS: Kachinas of the Puebloans

Kachinas of the Puebloans: Kachina Types & Ceremonies

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November 20, 2017 at 8:25 pm Leave a comment

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